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Collect Stamps in Your Adventure Passport

People want stamps in their passports. It’s just what we do when we travel. We want proof that we were there. We want the experience, we want the memories, we want the t-shirt, the sticker, the selfie, the stamp. Of course all of it means more when we invest a little time to absorb the history of the places we visit… so read up on a little history of each of these amazing adventures here and then get out and collect 7 adventure stamps and get the next adventure free.

Where do you collect these stamps? If you’ve got one of our passports, there is a place for each stamp, just like a real passport proving you have indeed “been there and done that”! If you want your own passport booklet, let us know upon arrival - then guard it closely each time you return to Moab for new adventures. Of course just like any passport stamp, you’ve got to be there to get the stamp! Present your passport (or what have you) to our front desk staff and they will gladly update your latest stamp.

UTAH: Birthplace of River Rafting

River Rafting

Before rubber rafts, when wooden hulls were shaped for straight lines across lakes, not rivers, a man named Powell dared to explore the last unmapped and unknown rivers and canyons of the west. That placed him squarely in Utah, in 1869. They were successful, proving that “running rivers” could be done in the deepest canyons, and wildest water in North America. It took another 50 years before Bus Hatch and his family near Vernal, Utah began taking boats down the Green River, just for the heck of it. Norm Nevills in Mexican Hat, Utah gave his horse trough a float down the San Juan River on his honeymoon… and started one of the first commercial operations after designing his own wooden boats. By the 1960’s surplus army rubber pontoons changed the industry forever, the rest is even more river running history.

River Rafting

Desert Solitaire & Arches Park

Arches National Park Tour

Arches National Monument was set aside in 1929 when Ed Abbey, famed monkey wrencher for the environmental movement, was just a babe. By the late 1960’s Arches was prepping a promotion from “monument” to “park” and Abbey was right there in the lonely backcountry working as the one-and-only backcountry ranger. Abbey’s time spent in the desert (feeling conflicted about keeping it to himself and sharing the beauty of arches with the “tourists”) is cleverly documented in his nationwide-environmental-cult-inducing book “Desert Solitaire”.

Arches National Park boasts the highest density of natural arches in the world with more than 2,000 - 43 of which have collapsed since 1977. 150 million years in the making, and we are lucky enough to see the show!

Arches National Park Tour

Adventure in Every Ride Since 1783

Hot Air Ballooning

The senses reel in any form of flight, but ballooning remains one of the only forms of flight unhindered by turbulence, vibration, or…well, a steering wheel. You’d think that after Kitty Hawk, ballooned flight would simply deflate; but there’s nothing quite like a balloon ride - and that’s not just a bunch of hot air! Adventure awaits every single balloon ride because no two flights are alike. Tremble not, your pilot knows the ropes. He also knows the terrain and can point out various formations, spires and canyons drifting in silence beneath the wicker floor. Wait, why wicker? We can fly to the moon and back, but we’re still using wicker baskets? Ask your pilot. There’s a fabulous reason!

Hot Air Ballooning

Moab: Mountain Biking Mecca

Mountain Biking

While the National Parks were still relatively empty, and the mining boom was all but forgotten by the early 1980’s, a new and unexpected renaissance was about to hit the hills of Moab. An entirely new sport called “mountain biking” marked the beginning of a Moab’s modern reputation as the “Adventure Capital of the West”. Mountain biking was pioneered in Marin County and Crested Butte, but Moab, Utah was the place where mountain biking sparked public imagination. It was a clever ploy by Hank Barlow to launch the first issue of “Mountain Bike Magazine” with photography of people riding the new pedaled contraptions on the rolling slickrock hills with red rock cliffs and blue skies blazing in the background - a cue taken from film director John Ford perhaps? It worked; and the rest is mountain biking history.

Mountain Biking

Where God Put the West

Horseback Rides

When iconic western film star “The Duke” John Wayne was filming “The Comancheros” in 1961 he called Moab the place “where God put the West.” No one has ever disagreed. But did Moab’s gigantic western backdrop make the Westerns, or did the Westerns make Moab iconically Western? Good question to ponder as you saddle up, trot out of the corral, and ride off into the sunset amongst the very same scenery - perhaps on the very same trails - that John Wayne himself rode on his way to a rescue. So quit wastin’ daylight, paint ‘yer wagon, and saddle up for scenery that’s as purty as a little red heifer in a flower bed.

Horseback Rides

General Purpose? I Think Not!

Jeep Rental

The word “Jeep” is instantly recognizable as a rugged 4x4 vehicle - synonymous with “Yankee Ingenuity” from WWII and almost every conflict since. But the origins of the name “Jeep” are somewhat more obscure… Some say it came from “G.P.” which stood for “general purpose” vehicle. But many, particularly in Moab, argue that a Jeep is anything but a general purpose vehicle. In Moab its specialties are especially well known and utilized.

Jeep Rentals

UTAH: Pioneering Canyoneering

Canyoneering

That’s right, Utah’s slot canyons are the birthplace of the modern sport of canyoneering. What is canyoneering? See if this helps: Mountaineers climb up, Canyoneers climb down, and Pioneers trek Westward…to Utah where they can descend ropes into the myriad slot canyons that drain Utah’s world famous Colorado Plateau. The pioneers of the sport all claim first descents in Utah, sooo… yeah, it’s pretty much legit. You know, the word “canyon” comes from the Spanish Conquistadors, trying to describe what they saw in the desert as “narrow valleys between cliffs”. There was no word for these unique features of the southwest, so they used the Spanish word for “pipe”, or “long tube”.

Canyoneering

Pilots Grounded in Red Dirt

Moab Air Tours

When flying is what you do, being grounded in the dirt doesn’t seem right… unless that dirt (in the form of canyons, towers, arches and bluffs) is the very reason for taking flight! There is no other place on earth quite like Moab, Utah - and Redtail Aviation knows it. Their pilots are not just pilots, they are “Air Guides” connecting every dip of the wing to something spectacular on the landscape below. You’ll know your guide loves the land just as much as their beloved plane and that your air tour was their best one yet!

Moab Air Tours

Vulcan and The Right Stuff

Jetboat Tours

When New Zealander Sir William Hamilton invented the water jet engine in 1953 he needed a way to prove its’ power and superiority. What better way to get notoriety than to take it up-river against America’s powerful Colorado River in the popular Grand Canyon? At the time, no one considered that a motor would even be remotely successful in an upstream test against the notoriously venomous Vulcan Rapid (known today as Lava Falls). “It was a nine day current-bashing marathon that saw the Hamilton Jet negotiate all obstacles, including the mighty Vulcan Rapid. Four boats made it up the Colorado River in 1960, all powered by Hamilton waterjets.”

Jetboar Tours

The New Duke (Move Over John Wayne)

Paddleboarding

Heralded from New Zealand and Australia, to Waikiki and California’s shores as The Duke of surfing, (move over John Wayne) is native Hawaiian, Duke Kahanamoku. A competition swimmer, Duke easily won Gold and Silver medals in the 1912 Stockholm Olympics and went on to popularize the ancient Hawaiian sport of surfing - and as early as the 1940’s used the technique of stand-up paddleboarding to deliver surf instruction in low surf. In the 1990’s the technique merited its own lesson, aside from wave surfing. In 2003 the introduction of Stand Up to the “Buffalo Big Board Contest” was met with overwhelming popularity. Since then, boards have been designed specifically for Stand Up Paddleboarding. Thanks Duke! We salute you, while trying not to fall off our boards!

Paddleboarding

Humvees & Slickrock

Hummer Safaris

1983 is the year the “Humvee”, or “High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles” were put into production - and 9 years later released to the public as “The Hummer”. During that time the economy of Moab, Utah transitioned from busted uranium mining to bustling recreational tourism. You might say it was a different kind of rock that attracted the new crowd: Slickrock.

Slickrock, slippery to a horse’s hooves, was found to be exceptionally “grippy” for rubber tires. First it was the “Fat Tires” of motorbikes & new-fangled mountain bikes, then the Hummer, and now all sorts of 4-wheeled “rock crawlers”.

Hummer Safaris
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Sun Divider Free Insiders Guide to Moab, UT

What to take, where to eat, where to stay, what to do, and a few little secrets on the side. Not unlike your own personal Jiminy Cricket, (minus the worries of the little guy getting smooshed) the Moab Insiders Guide will provide you with all the essentials for a perfect Moab experience.

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